about

Photograph of Andrew Dilts, presenting a lecture at Rowan University, Feb. 2017
Rowan University, Feb. 2017 (photo credit: Ed Kazarian)

Andrew Dilts is Associate Professor of Political Theory in the Department of Political Science at Loyola Marymount University.


Andrew Dilts is a political theorist who works in the traditions of critical theory and the history of political thought, focusing primarily on the relationships between race, sexuality, political membership, sovereignty, and punishment in the United States.

Photograph of Andrew Dilts, photo credit: Christopher Dilts
Andrew Dilts, Los Angeles 2013 (photo credit: Christopher Dilts)

Prof. Dilts studied economics at Indiana University and the London School of Economics before earning a doctorate in political science at the University of Chicago. Prior to joining the faculty at Loyola Marymount in 2011, Dilts was a Harper-Schmidt Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Liberal Arts at the University of Chicago, teaching exclusively in the College’s “Common Core” curriculum as Collegiate Assistant Professor of Social Sciences. During the 2016-2017 academic year, Dilts was in residence as a Member of the School of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study.

Dilts is the author of Punishment and Inclusion: Race, Membership, and the Limits of American Liberalism (Fordham University Press, 2014) which gives a theoretical and historical account of felon/criminal disenfranchisement as it has been practiced in the United States, drawing widely on early modern political theory, post-structuralist french thought, queer theory, disability theory, and critical race theory. Dilts is also co-editor (with Perry Zurn of Hampshire College) of Active Intolerance: Foucault, the Prisons Information Group, and the Future of Abolition (Palgrave 2016).

Currently, Dilts is at work on a book-length study that takes up Michel Foucault’s thought in relation to neoliberal theories of subjectivity, race, gender, and sexuality that emerge as part of “human capital” theory developed by “Chicago-School” economists. The project then turns to radical queer, trans*, and women-of-color feminist thought and activism to acknowledge an existing critical response to the hegemonic status of this depoliticizing discourse.

Dilts has also co-edited (with Natalie Cisneros of Seattle University) a special project for Radical Philosophy Review called “Political Theory and Philosophy in a Time of Mass Incarceration,” and has published articles in Political Theory, Foucault Studies, New Political SciencePhiloSOPHIA, and The Carceral Notebooks. Dilts is also a founding member of Abolition: A Journal of Insurgent Politics and the Prison and Theory Working Group.

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e: andrew [dot] dilts [at] lmu [dot] edu / p: 310.338.5165 / 1 LMU Drive / Los Angeles, CA 90045